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Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)
from america and its allies is on the cards. we just don't know when it might come. but as syria's ambassador to the u.n. said the country right now is in a state of war and preparing for the worse. >> that's john terrett reporting. bam as der. when you look at that bam and when you, might that be the reason why there has been hesitancy to get involved with syria. >> i don't think so at all. i think that if the united states wished to apply direct military force to take out the syrian air force, for example, it could do so. we face terrorist threats were hezbollah and iran already, and yes, it can get worse, but at the same time i think we're facing those things already. the issue for the. >> obama: administration ifor ff the conflict. >> can you talk about the question of why chemical weapons have become the red line? thousands of people were killed in syria by the government already, we didn't take action. >> right. >> suddenly because chemical weapons are used we're taking action. what sense does that make? >> yes, it's an interesting point of view. my point of view is really
to the role that america has played in that region for a long time. now, it's important that people know that, to get your point, because it's important for people understand what we're doing, why we're doing it, to understand first of all that our alliances are strong and we stand behind our alliances. second, that we are not picking a fight with anyone. we are not trying to militarize a situation there. we would like what has been happening in decades past to keep going. democracy has been spreading across -- prosperity has been spreading to a huge economic and political development and a part of world without any conflict at all. so that's the fight that we have on the pivot and that's why we're doing it and that's why we're saying what we're doing. nobody it's the wrong idea by the duty provided the of why we're doing it spent we only had a couple of minutes left and mechanical of our time because the to the invoke year is they put us on planes and send us back. we will take two questions. kimberly and no here. we'll take a cu key and then you can pick which one you're answering. >> you m
, but john tyler's views were consistent. letitia was different. >> here is 1840 view of america through the senses. the population reached 17 million in 26 states. we consistently see 30%. slaves #2.5 million, which is almost 15% of the population, and new orleans joins the list of the largest cities in the united states. we heard about the tylers and their attitude toward slavery. give us an indication of what was happening in 1840. >> this is a tremendous time of sexual tension. we like to think the country is divided regionally, that everyone in the north is anti slavery and everyone in the south is proslavery. it is not that simple. people in the north benefited from slavery and the slave trade until it was ended. they now move into a different economic arena. they no longer need slavery, and slippery as a threat to them because of the free labor system in the north, and the kinds of the economy that is needed to preserve institutions in the north are different from in the north are different from those in the south, so what is happening in congress is both groups want to control le
, they are trying to place in america in the important role of history. this is where they would have dinner. they would have a chance to meet one another, conversed socially and casually, and then they might be invited to dine in the dining room. after supper, the ladies would then adjourn back into the drawing room. maybe they would serve some coffee and tea. this was the social center of the house. if you were an invited guest of the madisons or part of the intimate circle of family or friends, you would be invited into the dining room from the drawing room. and here, dolly madison would in an unusual setting for the timeframe set at the head of the table and her husband, james, would sit at the center of the table. dolly would direct in, it -- with direct the conversation and james would be able to engage in intimate conversation with the people immediately to his right and left. this table today is that for eight people, but there could be as many as 20 people served in the dining room. that would not be unusual. and indeed, dolly madison considered dining at maag pier to be so much mor
as you know is one of america's most influential voices on cultural, political and education issues. he's the senior pfizer to project lead the way and on the advisory board of -- a chief education adviser to be in stock innovation. he is taught at boston university the university of texas at harvard and served as secretary of education under president reagan and was america's first drug czar under president george h.w. bush. it was the author of more than 24 books including to new york times number one bestsellers and the host of the old bennett's morning in america and has received more than 30 honorary degrees and as a final note a very long time ago bill and i were philosophy students together at williams college. bill will speak in a minute. he will be followed by david wilezol the co-author of "is college worth it?." david is the associate producer of the nationally syndicated bill bennett's morning in america and a contributor to the manhattan institute's higher education policy blog and at claremont institute fellow and studied greek and latin at the catholic university in washi
, it is a scandal. but if it came up in the of the context that you raised first, it's just part of life in america. >> ladies and gentlemen, on that note, floyd has kindly agreed to sign his book. again, critics have given it an incredible review, and it's just a breathtaking book. i've read and it's breathtaking. i would strongly urge you to have your book signed by floyd but if you could just remain seated for about 20 seconds. my last question to float, could you tell us if the society for challenge into getting and the supreme court questioning? [laughter] >> certainly much more relaxing. >> actually. on outlook know, ladies and gentlemen, please join me in thanking one of the most brilliant scholars and lawyers that this nation has had that has impacted many of our lives on a regular basis. thank you. [applause] >> you are watching tv on c-span2. 48 hours of nonfiction authors and books every weekend. >> up next, booktv's peter slen into his office and one. this weaknesses concludes with military historian antony beevor followed by victorian era expert judith flanders. antony beevor talked ab
of america and our allies. it matters because a lot of other countries whose policies challenge these international norms are watching. fate are watching. they want to see whether the united states and our friends mean what we saw a. it is directly related to our credibility and whether country still believe the united states when it says something. they are watching to see if syria can get away with it because then maybe they too can put the world at greater risk. make no mistake. in an increasingly complicated world of sectarian and religious extremist violence, what we choose to do or not do matters in real ways to our own security. some cite the risk of doing things but we need to ask what is the risk of doing nothing? it matters because if we choose to live in a world where a thug and a murderer like the shark assad can gas thousands of his people with impunity even after the united states and our allies said no and then the world does nothing about it there will be no end to the test of hours of the dangers that will flow from those others who believe that they can do as t
as you know is one of america's most influential voices on cultural political and educational issues. he's a senior at visor at project lead the way and on the advisory board of audacity.com and chief education advisor to -- he has taught at boston university university of texas and harvard and served as secretary of education under president reagan and was america's first drug czar under president george h.w. bush. that was the author of more than 24 books including two "new york times" number one bestsellers and a host of bill bennett's morning in america has received more than three honorary degrees bill and i were philosophy students together to bill will speak in a minute and he will be followed by david wilezol the co-author of kathleen tighe. david is the associate producer of the ashley syndicated bill bennett's morning in america contributor to mining the campus a policy blog. in his honor i tried to come up with an opiate let end quote addressing student debt and i suggest -- that is happy is he who has no debt. [laughter] >> that's good. [laughter] we look forward to your pres
to be buying. the president of the americas jerry smith joins us exclusively. good to have you on the program. >> thank you. >> thank you for joining us. a good story you are selling more tablets and devices than pcs, right? >> we are proud of that. in the quarter, we had an outstanding quarter. it's a reflection of our strategy, we are now teleselling more phones than tablets. that's a part of our pc plus. we believe we are a device company now. >> i want to ask you about. that all the speculation out there is what is going to happen with blackberry. are you in a position to acquire blackberry in. >> i can't comment on possible acquisitions. i will say right now organically we grew our smartphone business successfully. we will look at potential value and if it fits from a strategy perspective as well. >> so let's look at the difference here him i have a black brry in my hand. can these two merge and be a better device? what do you think, jerry? >> we will keep looking at all opportunities. >> why wouldn't you buy blackberry in they're so popular? what would stop you, seriously in. >> i think
for america from the steps of the lincoln memorial. his indelible words a watershed moment in the civil rights movement. today thousand also gather to commemorate the famous words that forever changed our country. >> 50 years ago there was so much fear, people were afraid to be afraid. the fear is gone. our country is better and we are a better people. we still have a distance to go. >> reporter: that distance front and center today as the nation's first black president will add his vision as the marquee speaker at the anniversary celebration. president obama acknowledges that, while a lot of progress has been made, king would not be satisfied. >> we have not made as much progress as the civil and social progress that we've made, and that it's not enough just to have a black president. >> reporter: there are renewed calls for addressing socioeconomic and racial disparities. the recent acquittal of george zimmerman and the shooting death of trayvon martin drew many to the streets across the country with protests. the president acting with candor. >> there are very few african-american in this c
holly williams they're advising america where to attack. and is the comeback over? wall street worries about war and housing. >> a cbs news poll finds race relations are going backward in the u.s. we're on the national mall, marking 50 years since the historic march on washington. a ground-breaking court ruling says you can be in trouble for sending a text to someone who is driving. >> we begin this morning with a look at today's "eye opener," your world in 90 seconds. >> if the order comes, you're ready to go, like that? >> we're ready to go like that. >> washington weighs the consequences for syria. >> u.s.-led military strike against syria could be launched as early as tomorrow. >> this is turning into a regional conflict and we need to reverse it. now is an opportunity to do so. >> the dow had its worst day since june. as possible military strikes hangs over wall street. >> bragging about taking control over media websites including twitter and "the new york times." >> fire continues to spread near yosemite. now growing 280 square miles, destroying more than 100 buildings. >> final
today could be the bloody war that america might be on the verge of joining. >> the closing bell rang about ament and a half ago. you can always count on uncertainty to rattle the market. that's exactly what happened here with syria's news these days. investors are on edge over the possibility of a u.s. military strike on syria. any time we have geopolitical or war-related issues, you're going to see investors hit the sell button and pile up on assets that are more safe. it's the reason that investors were buying up gold and treasuries and then you go ahead and roll into the market's already nervous about when the fed is going to pull back on its stimulus. so you factor in any type of unrest in the mideast, it just adds to the anxiety. oil prices closing up 3%, closing at $109 a barrel. syria is ranked 32nd among global producers but the concern is there could be this risk of a spillover, if neighboring countries get involved. if we could see a ripple effect, we could see oil prices rise even more and that could translate to higher gas prices for consumers, john, who are already watch
then will america do? what will iran do? what will russia do but i started off, mr. speaker, by making a reference for the first world war, next year we are going to be commemorating the stinking great of the events of august 1914. and those events have a worrying parallel because you have a series of actions and reactions which drew in an escalating fashion one country after another. nobody thought that the assassination of an obscure archduke woodley toward world event. this is a powder keg and we should not be lobbing weapons into the heart of such combustible material. >> we will break away from this british house of commons debate on syria at this point. were expected this debate to continue for several hours with possible votes later today. taking a look at democratic congressman saying there's no vital national security involved, even if it's in government has proved to deliver did use chemical weapons, which -- republican scott wigle tweets what's happening right now in british parliament should be happening in the u.s. congress. moral issue. is a death caused by chemical weapons wors were
in this tepid economy. >> well, jehmu -- >> person with the minimum wage -- average person in america is making $53,000 a year with a minimum wage worker, that's over two times the poverty rate. minimum wage has little to do with poverty. >> in fact, tracy, it's not the recession that americans are pointing to about why it's wrong to be dependent on government. but, in fact, it's the ease of getting a system. it's not the recession. you can get food stamps quite easily. >> look, i agree with jehmu. there was a time when it was embarrassing. my family immigrated, they would never in a million years take a government handout. things have changed, jehmu since you were a kid. hey, my neighbor's getting a check, i want one too. how come i didn't get a first-time home buyers check. everyone else got something i didn't. now we're starting to feel like, hey, where's my cut. and that's a bad, bad place for our country to be in. >> do you want to respond? >> well, again, i know from personal experience that the majority, overwhelming majority of people who are having to receive these programs to stand in
. they would say, the united states of america are. which signaled that it was not quite holding together. there was a fear it was holding -- going to fall apart. they called it regionalism, and later they call is sectionalism as they head to the civil war. so we know that nation is going to be a strong nation state, it is a democracy, and a two-party system and a strong president. that was none of the things the founders had intended. we look back and see that time as a time of growing pains. and we see dolley madison not knowing how this would end, was the perfect person to ease into the country and twa it was going to be. >> serving as the chief executive of the nation, he brought the real concept of how he wanted the role to be carried out. how did he approach it and how did she help him? >> well, you said "concept," and i think that's perfect, because he was the idea guy. he was very theoretical. he and other members of the founding generation understood as a concept "unit." it was their number one job. how do you do it? how do you bring forth unity? what dolley madison did is take t
of the united states of america, and to me, everybody that's willing -- strike that. everybody that's able to make that contribution should be forced to do it. then when the congress says that it's mandatory that we send troops, and these troops may be in harm's way, members of congress will hear from their voters, and their voters would say whether or not in their opinion there should be a red line, or in their opinion, whether or not the united states should attack another country, whether you call it war, limited war, the fact remains we were looking for weapons of mass sdru destructions, we didn't find it. so we know what war is, and people that have been involved in war know that it's hell, and it shouldn't be based on drawing red lines. >> you're obviously being very critical of the president right now for drawing that red line. i want to get reaction from your colleague, republican congressman peter king of long island. he's the chairman of the house subcommittee on counterterrorism -- counterintelligence and terrorism. this is a statement. i'll read it to you, congressman. presiden
and our values. and to others around the world, i want to make clear once again that america is not interested in spying on ordinary people. our intelligence is focused above all on finding the information necessary to protect our people and, in many cases, detect our allies. it's true -- protect our allies. it's true, we have surveillance capability, but it is also true that we have shown a restraint that many governments around the world won't even think of doing or refuse to show. that includes, by the way, some of america's most of her -- most we should not. forget stricter guidelines. some other governments will throw their citizens in prison for what they say online. let me close with one additional thought. the men and women of our intelligence community work every single day to keep us safe because they love this country and believe in our values. they are patriots. and i believe that those who have lawfully raised their voices on the -- on behalf of privacy and civil liberties are also patriots who love our country and want to live up to our highest ideals. so this i
's the chart. as josh brown pointed out this morning, for those who were -- thought this bet on america, on an american recovery was misguided -- >> or naive. >> slammed it in their face. stock's up 31% this year. >> to go back to the point as well, book value which buffett likes to use, up 2% for the quarter. in a period where travelers, some of the other big insurance competitors suffered because of their exposure to what was happening in the bond market. buffett what does he do? he buys companies. concentrated stakes in equities which did well in the second quarter and that helped outperform a the lot of his peers. >> buy a railroad, utility company in nevada hoping on recovery from recession there. big mac cr macro bets. >> tyson food, 69 cents, beat business 9 cents. revenue a beat. chicken and beef volume, up 4%, hard to do in this in economy. >> especially with beef prices the way they are. >> interesting you mention that. chicken feed costs up $105 million in the quart, less than 335 in the first half. the thinking is, they're looking at commodity costs coming down, even as pric
, to restore that shining city on a hill that is the united states of america. thank you and god bless you. [applause] >> thank you so much. first of all, i want to say i learned something new tonight. here in new hampshire, we say thank you all. in texas, they think all you all. is that more thank you or more people? >> technically speaking, all y'a ll is the plural of y'all. that was ronald reagan reminded us that freedom is only one generation away from extension. if we do not engage now in the freedom, we will want -- we will one day be telling our children what it is like to be free. i need to repair and oversight. we have another candidate. i know there is nobody here who wants to see custer win another term in the united states house. we know we have a potential candidate and former senator gary lambert. he is with us tonight. i hope you get a chance to say hello to him as well. now, our host, i do so much. >> hey, did we have a speaker tonight. joseph and i -- you turn down the heat to much. we would like to ask -- invite you all to have some coffee in the back. there is wonderful
by french revolutionaries and the a were influencing people in america. there were rumors that cities would be burned. it was terrorism they were anticipating. for example, the opposition party, the democratic republican party was very enthusiastic about the french and some of the ideals of the french revolution. >> jefferson in particular. >> this is where they begin to go in different directions. also, some of the press is very vehement in their criticism of the administration. so they muzzled the press and said that this is probably the thing that john adams is most criticized for. abigail, i believe, supported john. abigail was even more vehement during i think she is even more conservative than john during that time. >> the upshot of this, the people who were breaking the alien and sedition acts -- >> you could be jailed. >> it was said that the press made things up. he had no standards. it was not the they were supporting the french, but they were making up stories that were not the truth europe adams was very seriously worried about this. jefferson -- that were not the truth. adams w
at the time and what it was like to be america's first lady and not just the wife of an american mr. an american minister, but to be a wife and a daughter. >> the thing that i always think about with abigail is the relationship, the partnership. without abigail, there is no john. without john, there is no abigail.>> john is important to history. >> yes. with the support she provided to him in europe, in the presidency, in the vice presidency, she was so trustworthy that she could to -- take care of things. so he could go off and be this great public person, which was exactly what she wanted.>> to our guests, our thanks for helping us understand more about the life and legacy of america's second first lady abigail adams. thank you for your time. >> thank you. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> wednesday night, we continue our encore of the first season ladies," with dolly madison. , september 9, a look at the life of edith roosevelt. our website has a special section on the first ladies, including "welco
of the things we should take away from those statistics, that snapshot of america? >> one of the things is there is an expansion going on. this is one of the things that is very difficult for the adamses because politics are changing, and the changing politics means they are new englanders. they are federalists. as time goes by, as the population moved south and westward, it makes it more difficult for politics that they believe in. >> we are going to invite your telephone calls. we will be going to calls in just a few minutes. i am told you want to read us a passage from one of the letters. >> i would like to remark on the 39-year life span. that is not exactly accurate to the extent that children died much more rapidly. if a child survived to 12, probably the life span was much longer. many, many people lived into their 70's, as the adamses did. >> the five children -- how many of them survived to adulthood? >> four. >> four? you are getting a passage ready for us. you wanted to read us from the letter we talked about earlier, "remember the ladies"? >> right. in this particular letter
notorious criminals. the fbi's ten most wanted list, has chronicled america's infamous from james earl ray to tud bundy and the centennial bomber. accused murderers, drug traffickers and child parnographers. >> most of these folks have commit more than one very serious crime, rapes and murders, these are very dangerous people. >> ron hoska, who runs the ten most wanted program, is responsible for finding these people. >> 500 criminals have made the list in his 63-year history and 470 cases have been cleared. >> not all those are by arrest. some are in custody, some turned up dead, but 94% clearance rate is a tremendously successful program. but it's the other 6% that keep him and his agents up at night. >> a wiley fugitive who drops under the horizon can present a significant challenge to us. >> and even amid the top ten list of criminality, the story of one wiley fugitive stands out. you might know him and not even realize it. he could live across town, down the block, or maybe even closer. and if you know where to find him, the fbi could make it worth your while. this fugitive's catch me
countries, north ameri america, northern europe. emerging markets continue to struggle. overall, again, i think we're seeing a near-term issue. but going forward, i think you're going to be really happy with this company and i think over the long term over the next year or two i think you're going see pretty solid and strong growth. >> all right, jim channing sticking with his shares. we watch them down about 7%. moving on now to major news, president obama making a statement moment ace go on egypt. he said the u.s. will cancel joint military exercises with egypt. to help us understand this, john harwood joins us live now from washington with more. john? >> kelly, it was a minimalist response by the president. you had some people including former advisers of his own saying that the united states should suspend or cut off military aid to the egyptian government. the president did not do that. he said that they were going to cancel those bright star military exercises scheduled for next month and continue to consult with his national security team on other steps. what he was trying to do wa
, the islamists in syria will be emboldened, they will say this is america, turned you down again and the mother of arab states will see it as another sign of weakness and iran will be emboldened. >> let's talk about the arab league. those arab nations are not exactly taking a bold stand themselves right now. they've spoken out against the alleged chemical attack in syria, spoken out against bashar al assad but they're not ready to support any kind of military action here. what do they really want? >> the saudis and jordanians and others, their intent is to get rid of this regime. they want to see assad out and they want a tactical defeat of iran and hezbollah. they're not going to participate openly like some did like fattah in libya. one of the reasons we have this tragedy in syria is the regional powers are unable to provide the leadership, europeans on their own cannot provide leadership and because of the dithering of the obama regime, there is no leadership. everybody is waiting for an american leadership, they cannot do it on their own. >> president obama has a tough choice on syria. the
: every day more americans choose abc news, america's number one n it makes me feel happy and excited because i have a mentor in my life. it makes me feel good because i know i am helping someone. the first time i seen her smile, i knew it was gonna be a better year and a better day. she has changed my life, now i can be whatever i want to. she taught me never to give up, and i never will. mentoring works, become a mentor. >>> this morning on "world news now" -- moral obscenity. that's what the secretary of state is calling syria's alleged use of deadly chemical weapons. could the u.s. be on the brink of taking military action? >> fierce fire fight. monstrous storm of flames burning to yosemite national forest. the race to stop the fire from destroying ancient trees and polluting drinking water supplies. >> we never know the way the fires come up around here when they're going to overtake you. so safety first. >> a progress report as 4,000 homes and businesses are in harm's way. >> then watch out increased risk of walking while texting and talking on the phone. a killer combination. >
. that is the precursor to what is today macy's. >>> america's farming industry going through a major transition and that could open up bigger opportunities for individuals to invest in farm land. here now to tell us about the risks and rewards about farm land investing is john taylor, at u.s. trust. thank you for coming in today. >> thank you for having me. >> we should set the stage a little bit for why we're at this position. why you might need investors to come in to what used to be family farms. a lot more expensive to be a family farmer and have to be able to have a much bigger land parcel, correct? >> that's right. if you look at the most recent usda report, based on the census they did in 2007, you have farmers who are 65 and older and another 32% 55 and 65, so you kind of add it all up. >> 65% of the farmers. >> 65% of farmers are 5 ye5 yea and older. that's in transition over the next 10, 15 years. you need the next generation of america's farmers on the land. >> is it tougher to get younger people these days to do this? >> in a lot of ways, kids went off to college and they may have g
's happening. >> right? it's happening in america. a sad commentary. >> you know what, i saw it on andrew's face. >> depressing. >> why? we have al accomplished so much. >> depressing. >> look at the deficit reduction ha has occurred over the last three years. take it forward. it's 4 trillion over ten years. 4 trillion over ten years. >> you like it. jimmy likes it. yoep i don't understand it. >> the process is ugly. at the end of the day, we actually accomplished something. >> it's good, jimmy? >> 1.4 trillion when bush left office? today 643 billion. that's the number. >> is that good? i think it's fantastic. we should get below 500 billion. should put us where we were before the bush -- >> joe. >> i don't think the white house nodes to unsettle markets any more than they are unsettled. lock at the economy,ist very weak. a lot of underlying weak inside in the economy. why do we need this? there ought to be a negotiation, a discussion. we ought to have a chance to avoid the disaster let's go back to two years ago, i was luxuriously sitting on nan tuvenlth i had to leave to fly back to ne
desire is not to get america into a third middle eastern conflict. but he had gone out and said himself that if the syrian regime used chemical weapons that would be considered a red line. once he put himself out there, i think it was difficult for him given the gravity of this attack, a truly horrendous attack with chemical weapons for him to do nothing. >> ironically, quick take, does russia saying don't do this help the chances that it doesn't have to be a military response? >> no, but my guess would be we're trying to send a message to the russian this is is going to be a limited strike. we're not trying to overthrow assad and that will lead their response to not be that severe. >> peter beinart thank you for the insight. >>> let's turn to dangerous weather at home, the fierce wildfire burning in and around yosemite national park showing no signs of letting up and it's threatening san francisco's water supply and power grid. the rim fire burned through almost 161,000 acres so far, the 13th largest wildfire inle kaical history. cnn's nick valencia is live in groveland, california, tr
of america, can i ask you about that industry? obviously the billionaires are advancing on individual titles. you see bezos with "the washington post." the koch brothers may be coming in. warren buffett has been advancing into newspapers. what's the future of the industry in the country. i know you've done studies of how revenue streams ever changing. will it be as strong as it is in two decades? >> it's tremendous you're getting the interest in the investment from very savvy, very smart people from multiple backgrounds. the entire media landscape absolutely is transitioning. digital is changing the way all of us interact with media. i believe that newspapers are uniquely well positioned to take advantage of that transformation. we have unique content whether it's an opportunity newspaper who is covering an event, a sports event, city council that no one else covers, or a national or global brand like "the washington post," like "the new york times." the amount of unique, original content generated by newspapers surpasses any other media and whether it's delivered in print, in digital, onlin
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)

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